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Gardasil HPV Vaccine: Not Just for Females!

By now, most people are familiar with Gardasil's multi-media "One Less" campaign about HPV vaccination for girls and young women. HPV, the Human Papillomavirus is a common sexually transmitted disease that can cause genital warts in males and females, and lead to cervical cancer in females. Gardasil protects against the strains of HPV that are responsible for the majority of cervical cancers and two types of HPV that cause the majority of genital warts. You may have wondered, what about males? The Gardasil HPV vaccine is FDA approved for males and recommended by the CDC for boys and young men, ages 9-26 for the prevention of genital warts.

HPV is a very common sexually transmitted disease, affecting an estimated 75% to 80% of males and females. There are many types of HPV virus-- some types cause genital warts and other types cause female cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancer. For some, HPV resolves on its own, but there is no way to predict who will or will not clear the virus.

In girls and young women, ages 9-26, Gardasil is FDA approved to protect against the two types of HPV that cause 75% of cervical cancer cases, 70% of vaginal cancer cases, and 50% of vulvar cancer cases, as well as the two types of HPV that cause 90% of genital wart cases. In boys and young men, ages 9-26, Gardasil is FDA approved and recommended by the CDC to help protect against 90% of genital wart cases.

The Gardasil HPV vaccine is administered as 3 injections over 6 months. Ask your doctor about Gardasil if you decide it is right for your son or daughter, or for you. Coverage and assistance programs are available to help pay for Gardasil, visit www.gardasil.com for more information.
 

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This information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. It should not be used in place of an individual consultation or examination or replace the advice of your health care professional and should not be relied upon to determine diagnosis or course of treatment.